April 02-05 2020 • METRO TORONTO CONVENTION CENTRE

Faculty - Cathy Keenan

Cathy has always been fascinated with the human body and its potential for deep healing. She started practicing yoga when she was 28years old eager to learn how to move her body and change the trajectory of her life. Her love of learning persuaded her to quit her day job and go back to school to study Chinese Medicine. Almost 9 months pregnant when she graduated from school, Cathy developed heart failure, as a result of a very rare pregnancy related disease. This experience, along with her slow recovery and becoming a new mother deeply impacted her understanding of health and healing. From this perspective she gradually changed the way she practiced and taught. Over the years Cathy has developed workshops, trainings, retreats and classes that has combined yoga and Chinese medicine. Today Cathy enjoys taking an integrative approach to movement (inspired by yoga, Qi Gong, 5 Rhythms Dance, and other curious ways of moving) while continuing to share the deep wisdom and her love of Chinese Medicine.

Connect with Cathy Keenan
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Book into Sessions run by Cathy Keenan

Preserving our Jing "Essence": The Three Treasures

Cathy Keenan - SA5KEE

Thousands of years ago, the ancient Chinese believed the secret to a happy, healthy, and fulfilling life depended on cultivating what they called The Three Treasures (Jing, Qi, and Shen), which can be understood as our Body, Breath, and Spirit. This wisdom has sustained itself over time (perhaps proving even more important in modern life) as a guide for preserving, moving, and cultivating these vital substances and energies through lifestyle, diet, and movement. The first treasure, Jing, is considered the foundation of our health and well-being. Jing "essence" can be seen as responsible for our growth, development, and reproduction. Our Jing can be lost or built through various aspects of our lifestyle. Preserving this substance allows us to age more gracefully. Combining both dynamic and slow, integrated movements, we will explore movements that target specific organs systems responsible for storing and cultivating our Jing. FOR: beginners and teachers who want to learn more about this aspect of Chinese medicine and its applications in movement and modern life.

SATURDAY MARCH 30

5:30 PM - 7:30 PM (2 HRS)

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Moving our Qi "Vitality": The Three Treasures

Cathy Keenan - SU3KEE

Thousands of years ago, the ancient Chinese believed the secret to a happy, healthy, and fulfilling life depended on cultivating what they called The Three Treasures (Jing, Qi, and Shen), which can be understood as our Body, Breath, and Spirit. This wisdom has sustained itself over time (perhaps proving even more important in modern life) as a guide for preserving, moving, and cultivating these vital substances and energies through lifestyle, diet, and movement. The second treasure, Qi, is what gives us energy and vitality. We acquire this treasure through our breath and the foods we eat. A healthy body relies on a constant circulation of Qi which moves, warms and animates our body so that we may interact and experience a more fulfilling life. Combining both dynamic and slow, integrated movements, we will explore movements that target specific organs systems responsible for building and moving our Qi. FOR: beginners and teachers who want to learn more about this aspect of Chinese medicine and its applications in movement and modern life.

SUNDAY MARCH 31

2:00 PM - 4:00 PM (2 HRS)

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Cultivating our Shen "Spirit": The Three Treasures

Cathy Keenan - SU4KEE

Thousands of years ago, the ancient Chinese believed the secret to a happy, healthy, and fulfilling life depended on cultivating what they called The Three Treasures (Jing, Qi, and Shen), which can be understood as our Body, Breath, and Spirit. This wisdom has sustained itself over time (perhaps proving even more important in modern life) as a guide for preserving, moving, and cultivating these vital substances and energies through lifestyle, diet, and movement. The third (and perhaps most important) treasure is our Shen "spirit." We develop this treasure through our experiences in life. Often considered the mental aspect of who we are and what drives us in life, we can understand this treasure as our awareness and insight, and the connection to what gives our life purpose. Our Shen can be developed though our relationships and the skillful practices of self-development. Combining both dynamic and slow, integrated movements, we will explore movements that target the specific organ system responsible for housing and developing our Shen. FOR: beginners and teachers who want to learn more about this aspect of Chinese medicine and its applications in movement and modern life.

SUNDAY MARCH 31

4:30 PM - 6:30 PM (2 HRS)

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